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Jest to styl z kotrym niestety nie mialem kontaktu. Nie mam z nim zadnych doswiadczen.Jedyne co wim to masa pozytywnych opini wystawionych temu stylowi przez moich znajomych.
Oto co mozemy poczytac o jego historii:
As a requirement of my original Shodan testing, like many other students in traditional Karatedo, I was required to write an essay of some sort. I have found this to be the same in many other Classical Goju-Ryu Dojo that I have encountered. I submitted an on-going Thesis. So what, my essay came out a couple hundred pages long. As part of my future in Karatedo I plan to continuously update and expand this reference, handbook or as here, represented in an entire website.

"People with clenched fists cannot shake hands."

Ralph Bunch, Former Secretary General United Nations

Please also keep in mind a few things when reading this Portal: That knowledge that is not passed on is knowledge lost. (Or as I say “Live it, learn it and pass it on! “). The Style ‘Goju Ryu’ (translated the hard and soft way) was founded by Miyagi Chojun Sensei His teacher was the founder of Naha Te, Kanryo Higaonna. For an extensive history and Lineage overview, please see the following links.

The section “Historical Outline “




Semi Detailed, Goju Ryu has a traceable lineage of almost 2000 years. The section Historical Outline is roughly from the 1800's till today but our history does extend to much earlier. Please see the Section Chronological Overview for a detailed synopsis.

Goju Ryu Karatedo is said to display the oldest martial arts traditions and movements. Keeping the primitive traditional forms of martial arts yet full of fighting spirit. The system is based on a concept that hard and stiff is not good, however all soft and gentle can be equally harmful. The two should complement each other. This combination of the two gives Goju Ryu its beauty, disciplined movements, grace and flowing form. But lest anyone believe that Goju is merely a beautiful style of the dance with little of the art of defense, he need only watch two Goju players square off in Kumite against one another. Goju Ryu has received the most Chinese influence of all of the Japanese styles of Karatedo followed closely by Shorin Ryu and ****o Ryu. With the ‘Go’ (hard or positive) and the ‘Ju’ (soft or negative) in consistent harmony, one equalizing the other as with the rest of the universe. Through Goju Ryu training a simple act like blocking or striking will eventually occur naturally, a side effect of a pure of thought and mind and repetition.

Goju Ryu distinct postures do follow the standard philosophy of Chinese Martial arts in their resemblance and retaining the name of animals. A good description for the experienced Martial Artist (such as Shotokan Karatedoka) is to Goju Ryu compare to the regions of China and familiarize them with 'Nan sen Hoku ba'. Southern China has many rivers and the North has many Mountain ranges and large plains. This is where the term 'Nan sen Hoku ba' comes from. The Kanji, when written means Southern Boats and Northern Horses. In the South (China) people were fisherman, sailors. They were accustomed to working and spending long amounts of time in boats or in the water (perfect for Sanchin). The Kempo in the South was developed and practiced in limited space so the techniques and foot movements developed small as well and was suitable for close range fighting. In the North (China), there existed Metropolis and Military. These tribesmen were accustomed to riding atop and fighting from horses (perfect for Kiba Dachi). Their Kempo evolved into a system with very large exaggerated movements, designed for long range fighting. So to sum it up, Hoku Ba = North Horse (Kiba Dachi) and Nan Sen = South Boats (Sanchin Dachi).

There are many primary characteristics of Goju Ryu:

One being of course being Go and Ju as explained above.

Goju Ryu also carries the characteristics more so of a Bujutsu rather that that of Budo including grappling and throwing techniques as well as sticky movements along with quick explosive motions generated from the hips.

Another is Ibuki ('Ikibuki' - YO & IN), the famous breathing techniques which have been developed in a way to place the mind and body in harmony, uniting them for a more efficient person, and stimulating the bodies internal organs bringing you to a total state of awareness. Imagine with every block you inhale and with every strike you exhale. This would be soft to hard. Reverse the order of breathing and call it hard to soft. There are many other principles of application for Ikibuki and most synchronize breathing with body movement.

Jiyu-Kumite (free fighting) developed for close range fighting utilizing Neko Ashi Dachi (cat stance or cat leg stance) to quickly and easily move to and from other body positions for a more effective fighter.

Buji which means the absence of conflict or peace, another way of saying this is although harmonized Goju Ryu is at all times seeking a better way, not saying there is something wrong with the way that anything is done however the possibilities are limitless!


Goju Ryu shares its roots with other styles of Karatedo developed over the centuries from the fighting arts of China and rooted through Okinawa. Many of the school's movements are very soft, as in Chinese Kempo. In China, there were two counter parted arts of Chang, or fist. One is categorized as hard style, or External style. The other is Soft style or Internal style. Hard and External style represent Zen Budodhist initiated school such as various branches of Shaolin Chun, and Soft and Internal style represent Yee Chuen, Pai Kua Chang, and Tai Chi Chuen.

The Okinawa brand of Karatedo was originally imported from China more than 400 years ago, but had developed into a hard style during its years on the island by the influence of the Okinawa native arts. When these arts came to Okinawa, where they underwent changes and were combined with Okinawa Te. Many approaches to self-defense came into existence. Naha Te named after the city it was practiced in (Naha) over time developed in combination of other Te to become Goju Ryu. Kanryo Higaonna (see LINEAGE) was known as the highest authority of Naha Te. He as well as his successor Chojun Miyagi (1888-1953) made several treks to Mainland China to absorb more skill and to hone their art. Miyagi for the most part undertook invented and standardized the training and modernization of the techniques, and created the first named style of Karatedo (other than that named after the city it was founded). He later (1928) introduced Goju Ryu to the Japanese mainland. There Gogen Yamaguchi Hanshi, his successor on the mainland trained in and propagated Goju Ryu.

Disciplining the body and mind in combination have always been part of Japanese culture and is clearly expressed in Karatedo and many other martial arts whose origins can be found in Japan including Goju Ryu. Oddly, much of the system can and has been based on geometric and mathematical formulas. Much of this based on the function in dimension, space versus time and can be demonstrated so via mathematics calculation.

The section “Class “


A Roadmap to a standard Class Curriculum. Jumbi Undo (preliminary / warm up exercises), Kihon (Basics), Kihon Ido (Basics with Movements), Kata (Forms) and Kumite, Hojo Undo (supplementary exercises).

The section “JKF Soshiki “


Listing of Ryu-Ha and Kai-Ha and their affiliation in and association with the Japan Karatedo Federation.

Goju Ryu is not a sport, nor has it ever been intended to be so. All Goju Ryu Kata begin and end with a defensive motion. Remember there is no first attack in Karatedo! There are, however, counter measures which can be found through out the system.

So why all the different versions of Martial Art?


Before we discuss the individuality of or unification of Karatedo, we must first qualify what we mean by "Karatedo." There are two different categories of "Karatedo" within "traditional Karatedo" (excluding full-contact Karatedo such as Kyokushin). Some are Karatedo-Jutsu and Karatedo and others are Sport Karatedo (or Olympic Karatedo).

Karatedo-Jutsu means "Karatedo as Bujutsu." Almost all Chinese martial arts and traditional Okinawa Karatedo belong to this category. As well in recent years Mario Higaonna’s IOGKF style of Goju Ryu was pronounced as Karatedo-Jutsu. In Karatedo-Jutsu (like any other Bujutsu) the primary development is in the body for self-defense reasons and physical training. It usually does not carry as strict class-room (Dojo) rules as Budo. There is absolutely no necessity for Karatedo-Jutsu schools and styles to unify. Rather, they must remain independent to preserve their purity as a style. Karatedo-Jutsu is (and should remain as) a personal art for use in combat. Sports competition will simply end up removing the edge from the sword if practiced in Karatedo Jutsu. Only demonstrations (not competitions) should be held because there is no way that true Karatedo-Jutsu techniques (or any other Bujutsu techniques in the same manner) can be used in tournaments without injuring or killing competitors. Doing so for the sake of Bujutsu practice was allowed 400 years ago, up until the time of Miyamoto Musashi. To avoid injuries, competitors would have to execute techniques that do not injure their opponents; this would corrupt their arts.

Karatedo-Jutsu, in many cases, has been taught in secrecy because you don't want to let your enemies know your techniques and skills. (Karatedo-Jutsu in Okinawa was kept in secret not only because the people of Okinawa had to fight against Japanese samurais but also because they had to fight against other villagers). There are hundreds of different schools of Bujutsu in Japan (including various styles of Kenjutsu, Jujutsu, Aikijutsu, etc.). In Japan, all Bujutsu people get together once a year in Kyoto to demonstrate their arts and skills (Kyoto Taikai).

On the other hand, Karatedo means "Karatedo as Budo." Karatedo (like any other Budo disciplines) is designed to build the character of the person who practices the art. The object of Budo is "to cultivate character, enrich the ability to make value judgments, and foster a well disciplined and capable individual through participation in physical and mental training utilizing martial techniques." (The Budo Charter).

The seed of Karatedo was spread when Sensei Itosu began teaching Karatedo in Okinawa Middle Schools. To fit Karatedo into the physical education curriculum, he combined, in effect, Karatedo-Jutsu (Toude) with the concept of sports, which had just been imported to Japan from the Europe. Until then, Karatedo had only been taught to improve the practitioner's physical or mental well-being as well as for the sake of self-defense. It has always been one of the combat skills required to Okinawa Police and Homeland Defense.

Funakoshi Sensei (who studied under Sensei Itosu) further developed the idea of Karatedo after he moved to Tokyo. His mentor, Dr. Jigoro Kano was the founder of judo who developed judo based on jujutsu. Dr. Kano was also the founder of the Dai Nippon Taiiku Kai (Japan Athletic Association), {The Dai Nippon Taiiku Kai was the first Japanese member of the IOC (International Olympic Committee), and the first Japanese representative to the Olympic games in Stockholm). Dr. Kano was not only the father of judo, but also was the father of sports in Japan. Note that this was also the time when Kenjutsu was transforming into Kendo under the authority of the Dai Nippon Butoku Kai (Japan Martial-virtue Association).

Funakoshi Sensei decision to change Karatedo (China-hand [Toude]) to Karatedo (empty-hand) included philosophical transformation from Bujutsu to Budo. This influenced all other Karatedo styles. However, some schools have chosen to remain as Bujutsu while others chose to become Karatedo. Generally speaking, the Okinawa styles (e.g., Okinawa Goju Ryu) are more Bujutsu-like, while the Japanese styles (e.g., JKF Goju-Kai) are more Budo-like.

Budo is a combination of Zen, Bujutsu, and sports. Practicality of techniques is not as important as safety of the practitioners. For example, Kendo is a Budo. The strikes in Kendo (such as "men," "Kote," and "do") are to "hit," rather than to "cut." A person with a rank of Yon-Dan in Kendo probably could not necessarily cut anything or anyone with the way they swing Shinai (bamboo stick). Similarly, someone holding the rank of Go-Dan in Karatedo could not necessarily kill anyone with the way they punch during Ippon Kumite practice, because they don't practice to "kill." (This is the difference between "Satsujin Ken (killing sword)" and "Katsujin Ken (life-giving sword)" described by Yagyu Munenori.).

"When practicing daily, one must constantly follow decorum, adhere to the fundamentals, and resist the temptation to pursue mere technical skill rather than the unity of mind and technique." (The Budo Charter).

Tournaments (Shiai) in Budo have a specific purpose, which is to assist the training, rather than merely to determine the winner. The Budo Charter cautions: "In a match and the performance of Kata, we must manifest Budo."

In Karatedo (as being a ‘Budo’) we must manifest Budo spirit, exert your self to the utmost, win with modesty, accept defeat gracefully, and constantly exhibit temperate attitudes.

Traditional Karatedo, coming or going?


Personally and professionally I have reviewed the views and ideals of many Sensei and practitioners on why be a separatist or inclusive. Not all but many Sensei have an open mind and have tried to see things from others point of view. I think we should take a closer look at this unification of sorts. If the ****o Ryu or Ryobu Kai (just as an example) were to include all the Kata of Wado Ryu, Isshin Ryu and Uechi Ryu I believe it would be the role model of Unified Ryu. As it now stands (I believe) ****o Ryu contains the most Kata of the four major styles (all the Kata of both Goju Ryu and Shoto Kan). With the Unification of the Associations, the feelings of alienation of Ryu-Ha and Kai-Ha that have long parted ways can again be reunited.

The current unification of the respective World and National Federations posts the certainty that Karatedo is maturing in ways of which associations such as the AAU of the United States (in the 1970's) thought were unforeseeable. However with this 'Unification' of styles the possible backlash, and I repeat its only possible, can easily take away the individuality in every one of the styles of Karatedo. This Unification presents the possibility of deterioration of the many traditions of the respective Ryu. I am not Japanese and do not fore-see myself to become the headmaster of any Ryu or Ha, so I don't have any real stake in that eventuality, but it does seem a bit unfortunate.



So what do I mean by that? Well if there was one master style, lets call it X-Ryu, And X-Ryu had primary control of the X-Kai Federation, and through this federation (even while meaning to do well) unified A, B, C & D Ryu into X Ryu to make a stronger X-Kai. Each individual Ryu would lose what points and characteristics that make it special. X-Ryu would now have all the Kata and linear movements of A-Ryu, all the Kata and Circular movements of D-Ryu, the history and training syllabus of B-Ryu and the Discipline and Kumite methods of B-Ryu.

This new 'Master' style could do more damage than good as well as it has been proven that when a style gets too big it falls apart dangerously (Remember the USA Goju Kai in the 1970's had 20,000 students in the New York City area alone! And look where it stands in the USA today as it has less than 1500 practitioners in the entire country).

Please remember all of the above is only one translation of how I see it, I have many other views and possibilities however this is only one idea and is not open for debate. Much of Karatedo is already unified under Kata, history, tradition syllabus etc.

Karatedo without imagination becomes Dance

Karatedo without Bunkai becomes Ballet,

And Karatedo without thought becomes lost.

About change




The experience of bringing together other Goju Ryu clans of both old and new friends and foes has added to my over all knowledge. Sure we all practice and do things our own way but it comes from the combined input of many influences. Some try to look at many things from many different directions and points of views (mostly trying to see things from other people’s point of view).



Another direction that "change" has come is a desire for pushing defined movements and having or becoming highly technical and refined in performance of Kata and Kihon. We look at this from a three-part perspective. One is from the Dojo and how we do things different from other Dojo whom of course do things different from others. Second, is the understanding of how and why different Goju Ryu Dojo or schools and associations make such performances, third has to do with the next paragraph.



Our views for change have to do with my reasons for joining and studying with other Organizations (JKF, USA-NKF, Dai Nippon Butoku kai, JKGA, Meibukan and AAU etc.). Because they are on a worldwide level they have had congressional agreements and issues, which have been settled by boards of masters, not just individuals. We can look at these "associations" for their hindsight and learn from them just as we learn from our teachers however on a much broader level. This adds not only to your knowledge but makes you a better rounded Goju Ryu practitioner which will reflect in your students future, all of our recognition and how and why Karatedo has evolved into what it is today and where its going in the future.



In the previous paragraph we answered the question of belonging to a greater or larger system or to just take the independent route. The combined thoughts and ideas of many will always outperform the thought and mind of one. We should consider ourselves fortunate to have infamous teachers, as the root to our teaching in Goju Ryu because they have put the 'ideal' into my head even though Yamaguchi Sensei was his teacher, there is more to learn than any ‘One’ instructor can teach me. That we should never limit ourselves. And that if knowledge is limitless then we should never be satisfied with one solitary answer to any question.



Our final “ideal" of change pertains to time. Think of this. Boxers of the 18th and 19th century do not fight as boxers of the 20th century do. If boxers of the 20th century were to fight palms up, and rotating their hands one over the other as those in the 19th century, they would be slaughtered. The same goes for Karatedo. Performance, evaluation, understanding and analization have different meanings than those posed in the previous century. Fighters of today do not move, attack or defend as those from yesteryear. If Chojun Miyagi Sensei were alive today, surely the meaning and Bunkai of his Kata would be different from what it was in the 1940’s. On the flip side of this, there is a point to remember; that what was yesterday may not have the same meaning today. To keep the kata as close to Miyagi Sensei original version is a part of respect for Karatedo. To continue to practicing diligently, training our bodies and minds makes our training Budo. And having a dedicated and open mind looking to expand our art and practice for our physical well being makes Bujutsu.



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Speaking on Kumite


Goju Ryu Karate is said to display the oldest martial arts traditions. Keeping the primitive traditional forms of martial arts yet full of fighting spirit. The system is based on a concept that hard and stiff is not Good, however all soft and gentle can be equally harmful. The two should complement each other. This combination of the two gives Goju Ryu Karate its beautiful, disciplined movements, grace and flowing in form. But lest anyone believe that Goju Ryu is merely a beautiful style of the dance with little of the art of defense, he need only watch two Goju Ryu players square off in Kumite against one another. Goju Ryu has received the most Chinese influence of all of the Japanese styles of Karate followed closely by To-on Ryu and ****o Ryu. With the ‘Go’ (hard or positive) and the ‘Ju’ (soft or negative) in consistent harmony, one is equalizing the other as with the rest of the universe. Through Goju Ryu training a simple act like blocking or striking will eventually occur naturally, a side effect of a pure of thought - mind and repetition. There are many primary characteristics of Japanese Goju Ryu:

[One being of course being Go and Ju as explained above.

[Another is Ibuki (YO & IN), the famous breathing techniques which have been developed in a way to place the mind and body in harmony, uniting them for a more efficient person, and stimulating the bodies internal organs bringing you to a total state of awareness. And besides, all engines must have air.

[Jiyu-Kumite (free fighting) developed for close range fighting utilizing Neko Ashi Dachi (cat stance or cat leg stance) to quickly and easily move to and from other body positions for a more effective fighter.

[Buji which means the absence of conflict or peace, another way of saying this is although harmonized Goju Ryu is at all times seeking a better way, not saying there is something wrong with the way that anything is done however the possibilities are limitless!

Disciplining the body and mind in combination have always been part of Japanese culture and is clearly expressed in Karate-do and many other martial arts whose origins can be found in Japan including Goju Ryu. Oddly, much of the system can and has been based on geometric and mathematical formulas. Much of this based on the function in dimension, space versus time, kind of relative to chronosynclasticinfindibulum - i.e.: The theory of the universe being curved and how all matter, time and space is intertwined and connected with one-another and can be proven so via mathematics calculation.

Goju Ryu is not a sport, nor has it ever been intended to be so. All Goju Ryu Kata begin with a defensive motion. Remember there is no first attack in Karate! There are however counter measures, which can be found through out the system.

Kumite, of which can be broken up into three Major divisions:

[ Kihon Kumite – Basic Stance or rooted Kumite [

[ Yakusoku Kumite – Prearrange Kumite [

[ Jiyu Kumite - free style sparring [

Jiyu Kumite is a matter of free style sparring in which the pinnacle of care is taken to use all of the applications learned in the previous divisions in both offensive and defensive manners, while making minimum or no contact with your foe. Thus stressing the practical theory that Karate is for defense only. During Kumite you must have absolute conviction, which comes only from constant practice. Kumite was designed to sharpen and apply your techniques since you have done them for so long without a partner or with your invisible partner. Much of your conviction or confidence will come from having restrictions and being aware of such and from having a strong mind which Goju Ryu training has prepared you for such.

There are basic practices that make a great Jiyu Kumite player. They are Timing; Distance; Speed; Power; technique; Control; and most of all Character.

Character is what makes one fighter different from any other. Your character in Jiyu Kumite shows a direct reflection of whom you have been taught by and the surroundings you can normally be found in. In Jiyu Kumite there is no looser or winner however there is points of aggression and defensiveness. Jiyu Kumite must be felt and not feared and your mind is engulfed in the situation at hand showing your personal characteristics.

Jiyu-Kumite:


The exercise of free sparring or combat. Kumite is one of the final points of Karate. As the result of combat it is unlimited in its combination of techniques only by the practitioners level of knowledge and how many different ways the body can be used as a defense mechanism or as an offensive tool.

What we know today as tournament or sport Kumite was invented as Jiyu-Kumite in the early 1930’s by Gogen Yamaguchi Hanshi. It was devised as a way of preventing injuries commonly found from practicing techniques in the Dojo, and to avoid to such altercations as Kakedameshi (a true street challenge). Originally it was not intended for competition as it is now however both Jiyu and Yakusoku Kumite have evolved into a sport decision of winner or looser and is here to stay, which can be recognized as Ippon Kumite.

Dojo Kumite

Dojo Kumite consists of two primary types, Jiyu Kumite: Free Sparring, and Yakusoku Kumite: Prearranged Sparring.

In Yakusoku-Kumite: This is the last introductory drill before Jiyu-Kumite, sparring. Pre-arranged single, double, triple, and more complex movements are preparation for sparring. In this type of drills the participant practice the patterns, alternating offensive and defensive actions.

Kumite Renshu: joining hands, sparring practice. Not sport karate sparring. Kumite renshu encompasses the essence of kobo no kata: the application of those defensive and offensive activities within the kaishu gata that are more representative of actual fighting. Through kumite renshu one may identify the practical meaning (or real purpose) of kata. Please remember that kata is not only kick and punch but contain tuidi (grab hand), kyusho-jutsu (vital point techniques) and nage (throws).

In Jiyu Kumite there is a great deal of moving in and out quickly and weaving from side to side, in contrast to the hard schools which concentrate more on straight forward movements. Naturally, all this fast motion lends itself to graceful and artistic techniques. A basic Kumite stance, called the cat stance, is a very soft one with one forward foot poised heel high, ready to move quickly in any direction. Extremely fast, it relies on an aggressive style of attack, with the emphasis on delivering blows "hard" but with easy effort and in rapid succession. Another facet of Goju Ryu is the extreme closeness with which the blows are delivered in Kumite. The school emphasizes control of motions and a student is supposed to be able to stop a punch or kick only fractions of an inch from target. The opponents don't have much time to stand still and to look cautiously for openings. They are exchanging kicks and punches rapidly, always moving, not only forward and back, but maneuvering from side to side and aiming blows from the outside left or right. He believed that just the practice of Kata (forms) and the prearranged steps in sparring called Yakusoku Kumite inhibited too many of the students. Under the movements of the Okinawan system, he noticed that many of the students could not create combinations of techniques readily enough or follow through with an advantage when an opening presented itself.

What Yamaguchi wanted to do was to open up movements to make for faster play and to allow greater freedom of movement. He wanted a system that could be tailored to individual needs yet still retain the basic fundamentals of the system. The idea he hit upon was Kumite, or free-style sparring. At first, the Kumite was systematized along boxing lines. After that, it was a natural step to go from free-style sparring to tournament play. But in Going from the Dojo to the tournament hall, the system of Kumite underwent further transformation. Yamaguchi called upon his knowledge of the other martial arts to set up a tournament style. This time he leaned heavily on the principles of Kendo (swordplay) in devising rules[1] of Hiai (competitive) Jiyu Kumite for sport. Kendo was favored for two reasons: it emphasized form when delivering a strike and it limited the target area. Despite many differences with others over the areas to be left open for attack, Yamaguchi settled on the torso, back side and head as target areas while accepting other body parts as being available for manipulation to attain these limited target areas.

As he explained in silencing his critics: "In Kendo, a real blade can cut any part of the human body and cause damage or fatal injury. But for safety purposes, points are made for striking only the head and stomach." So too for Karate, he said, the strike zone should be limited. And so were the types of blows that could be delivered. For Shiai, the opponents are restricted mainly to kicking and punching. Elbowing, clawing, and other finger and open hand strikes were disallowed. However, for Dojo free-style sparring, the play is wide open with no restrictions. For this reason, as has been often observed, the best player in the Dojo may often not be the best tournament player, and vice versa.

Kumite in Competition

Please note that point sparring Kumite is not a formal or integral part of Goju Ryu. Although today’s Tournament Kumite is a derivative of Kumite, which was invented by Goju Ryu Kai leader Gogen Yamaguchi. Its original purpose was to practice technique with the greatest of control. In time however, Goju Ryu Kai leaders did sponsor and support tournament fighting as well as establish a reputation as the tournament players to be reckoned with especially during the 1960’s and 70’s, the time of Goju Ryu greatest following of practitioners.

The primary Ideals of any Kumite match are simple; that is, to win! By outwitting your opponent, developing mental superiority, tactical skills and strategies, and if the match is physical, then physical fitness as well then you will be successful in victory. Many principles of Karate-Do as I have mentioned previously can be applied to life, because Karat-Do is a Budo. As with life itself you must set Goals and improve constantly to continue being the superior player.

There are many major factors that come into play for any one wishing to win in any type of Kumite:

Kime: The theory of Kime is the use of explosive attack to a specific target using the appropriate technique and maximum power in the shortest time possible. It is a theory that can be applied to striking blocking or kicking.

Speed: Being highly responsive in everything you do is great, however doing it quickly and without hesitation is just as important. Do it over and over until your opponent has reached their breaking point or simply becomes frustrated with their lack to deal with your speed. Speed must be developed through practice and more practice.
Finesse: Be aware that single techniques can been seen and read as easily as you can see and read those of the same nature from your opponent. Become creative in your attacks and defense. Use fakes, faint your shoulders, fake kicks for strikes, fake strikes for kicks. Give away nothing, however make what you do give away not what it really is. Remember the duck that sits still in the water is a “Dead Duck” or a “sitting duck”, however the duck that is flying in the air is a moving target. A much harder target to hit I might add. If you are moving, learn to move smoothly into and out of your stances so your techniques flow freely without loosing valuable time. Develop footwork from the basics of your Dojo and style and modify them to fit you. Know your opponent’s best techniques. Know his techniques better than he does. He has never seen them from your outside point of view. Either draw him to use these techniques so you may counter them or prevent him from using them or better yet, force him to use them expending energy while you counter them because you have already visualized how to do so.

Finesse is possibly the greatest asset any fighter can have. A combination of experience and confidence, the 35-year-old fighter who has knee and elbow problems can easily out finesse the 20-year-old un-experienced fighter with lightning fast however mundane and unrefined techniques. You must use your finesse to manipulate your opponent, forcing him to do your bidding so you can respond however you wish.

Timing now that you can respond, when is the right time? Visualize what the benefits are of starting just a little earlier or later and how to take advantage of the opening timing can create.

Distance: To far is too far; too close is to close. Choose your techniques according to the appropriate distance using your speed and timing to fill the space between you and your opponent. It is very important to maintain and control your opponent within your range and distance.

Reaction: Be aware, eyes open, ears listening in all directions. See everything you opponent does even though your eyes are set only on one spot. Respond appropriately. If you have been practicing and visualizing different scenarios then you should have multiple options available to respond with. You should however never wait for your opponent to attack. Constantly push him so you actually have control of his attack. Giving him the opportunity to attack only when you want him to and how you want him to. Limiting how he can actually attack will allow you to pick and choose your reaction.

Aggression: Don’t be afraid to attack first or to attack at all for that matter. In any form of battle weather it be mental or physical, it is still battle and there will be a time you must either attack or counter attack or be defeated. When you are on the attack you have more openings exposed the when you were not. Because of this you must know of your weaknesses when you are attacking and be prepared to counter based on your opponents knowledge of you weakness. Intimidate your opponent with your spirit and use your aggressiveness to weaken him so you can attack him not only physically but mentally and from the inside as well. When you are an aggressive fighter, be aware that all eyes are upon you. You must change your style of fighting for each opponent you face for just as you have been watching them they are now focused on you. To be an aggressive opponent you must have the stamina to last 10 times longer than the average match, which is 2 to 5 minutes. That’s and average of 30 minutes time both aerobically and an-aerobically.

Defense: You must not trust your opponent in battle in any way. Rules are not concrete on any level of battle in life. Courtesy is not a requirement. Keep your guard up at all times. Polite gestures can be considered a byproduct of Budo, however true to life battle is more like a Bujutsu.

When fighting any kind of Kumite you must be fully confident of what you have learned and practiced. You must be at your peak at all times, prepared without a moments notice to react and overcome with lightning sharp techniques delivered by a professional player who has trained for moments that can come at any time. You must have self-control and a desire to win. When you travel either across town or across the country to compete or to due business, you must Go knowing and wanting to return successful. The same goes when your opponent or opponents come to your hometown or backyard. There must be no second thought of your destiny, which only you can control. Not every technique is for every player. You must define your Kumite to fit you and refine it to a point that it appears you have your own style of Karate-Do.

For some fighters it is ok to have a set pattern or series of attacks as long as those patterns and attacks can be modified to suit the match at hand. Have these patterns and attacks well rehearsed and ready to switch to a different one all together at any moment.

Shobon Kumite

Competitive or sport Kumite has changed with the times. As with Children from generation to generation becoming smarter and smarter. Kumite has evolved into a highly technical art. No longer can traditional training methods be strictly followed. Modern day scientific application and Kinieseology play a major factor in the decisions of who will become the champions on an International and National level.

There are some important points to remember while participating in these competitive tournaments.

[ Win matches one point at a time, Win tournaments one match at a time.

[ You must visualize yourself winning and what techniques it will take to overcome you opponent. Positive visualization. Tell yourself how you will win.

[ Avoid the ideals of the political match. Weather or not there is such a thing, having a conscious thought of such will weaken your spirit and hinder your performance. Causing your own Blackballing within certain regions is not worth the hassle because you felt their was bias is the decision of an outcome.

[ There is no referee in the world who got up this morning saying, “Today I am going to make sure that person does not win”. Your performance and its outcome are purely your own responsibility and destiny.

Personal list of Goals I use in Kumite:


I read and imagine these rules over and over before every Competition. Whenever I find a new weakness within myself I add the solution to this list and read it again.

[ Stay off the line of attack. Never step backward. Only step to the side then counter attack as my opponent goes past. Circle and move. Never turn my back to escape. Step back one-step maximum.

[ Increase my stamina.

[ Keep smaller opponents outside of their range to attack and within my own.

[ Use my body length and weight to my advantage, pressuring smaller opponents and out-finesse larger ones.

[ Out finesse all opponents.

[ Sweep smaller opponents continuously with follow up. Smaller opponents should never sweep me.

[ When dealing with an opponent who grabs switch to a boxing style.

[ Have stronger focus and concentration than any other persons in the room.

[ Smaller opponents should never be allowed to score with a kick.

[ Keep my hands up. Keep my knees bent. Turn my body making my torso a smaller target. Keep my hips forward as in Sanchin. Keep my eyes open and aware.

[ Be overaggressive, using caution, counter attackers can be dangerous.

[ Make minimal movement with the shoulders while striking; strike with the elbows close to your body. Only motion my shoulders when fainting or dropping my Gyaku Tsuki under my opponent.

[ Intimidate hometown and tournament favorites. NEVER let anyone beat me in my own backyard!

[ Watch for openings or set them up. Use your timing to exploit them. Have excellent timing while being patient with your attacks. Your elbows should not drift away or your body when blocking or striking.

[ Know the rules before entering the ring, if there are none then take no prisoners.

[ When defending you should also be attacking. Block and strike at the same time or consecutively.

[ Keep moving. When you hold still you are a target. When you opponent stops moving he is either setting up for power attacks, trying to conserve energy and tired or he is thinking of his next movement. In any case this is an excellent opportunity to attack him viciously and intimidate him.

[ If you have been taught to ‘always leave your opponent a way out,’ then limit his options to the way out being either running from the ring or being beaten.

[ Do not provide my opponent with openings he can exploit (i.e. watch out for that Gyaku Tsuki).

[ If he pauses to adjust his glove or Gi or anything, Hit him hard and hit him repetitively. Take advantage of his every error. If he misses on an attack you must counter without hesitation. Force him to make mistakes of this nature and pay the consequences.

[ Focus on his center, when he inhales this is the time to attack, when he leaves the ground this is the time to attack. When he hesitates or faints-exploit them.

[ Pay attention to your Coaches or Sensei recommendations, they can see thing you cannot from a third person’s point of view. Use their experience and knowledge to your advantage.

[ With any attacking combination, step off the counter attacking line immediately

[ When charging use multiple attacks in combination to sweeps and kicks head strikes and body shots. Continuous combinations.

[ O-Kuri Harai, Gyaku Tsuki.

[ Fake Mae Geri to Mawashi Geri.

[ Pump fake front Mae Geri, 2 times, lift back knee to Mae Geri and attack Gyaku Tsuki.

[ Fake Mawashi Geri to Ura Uchi

[ Fake Mae Geri to Reverse Mawashi Geri (Kake Geri)

[ Fake Oi (Kizami) Tsuki (lunge punch), while stepping forward and Shifting weight use that front hand to knock your opponents front hand down striking him with your other hand before he has the time to recover.

[ Gyaku Tsuki low, use trained block / strike method.

[ Block opponents Gyaku Tsuki with Kaishu Chudan Uchi Uke, Strike Gyaku Tsuki.

[ Grab opponents front hand with your front hand and sweep with the same front foot forward. Then strike Gyaku Tsuki.

[ Grab opponent with front hand, sweep with back foot, and let go before striking Gyaku Tsuki.

[ Do not allow Ashi Barai, visualize it coming, lift your leg, and do not hesitate to strike when the opponent goes by.

[ Fake a strong Jodan Ura Uchi and follow up with Soto or Mawashi Geri.

[ Side step with the back foot, sweep with the front, strike Gyaku Tsuki, continue to follow through.

[ Fake Jodan Oi (Kizami) Tsuki, followed immediately by Jodan Gyaku Tsuki, follow with a very focused and deliberate Mae Geri.

[ Block Mawashi Geri with arm of sidekick is coming then strike with opposite hand.

[ Kizami, Kizami, Gyaku Tsuki.

[ Step with front foot to 45degrees off the line, slap down (hard) opponent’s front hand with my front hand, strike Uke Ken. Prepare and recover quickly for response. Or set up Mawashi Geri with new lead foot.

[ Hiki Ayumi Ashi-Ashi Barai followed with Gyaku Tsuki.

[ With back foot-step 45degrees circling your opponent while at the same time to adjust your balance Ashi Barai his front foot with yours followed by Gyaku Tsuki or Kizami/Gyaku Tsuki.

[ Dictate my opponent next move. Allow him only to move where I want him. Set my apponent up 3 moves beyond our current position.

The Movement and Momentum of Goju Ryu


Once, while warming up before attending a seminar noticed movements of an old Japanese man wearing a sweat suit. Before he was introduced to the class, even before most of those there knew who he was (the room had plenty of other older Asian men wearing Gi and Black Belt), I knew clearly he was a long time Goju Ryu instructor because of the magical fluidity in his hands, his strong hip movements and his feather-like walk. Teruo Chinen of the JundoKan did give an excellent Seminar that day.

Whether it is the slightest twitch in the hip at the end of a technique, the thrust in a kick or the over exaggeration of the hip when blocking, the hips consistently generate that necessary power that differentiates the experienced Karate-Ka from an eclectic amateur.

Analogy:

Hip Sun
Largest bone in the Human Body Largest Mass in the Solar system
Upper & lower body rotates with the hips All of our planets orbit around sun
Generates the most power in the body Is the most powerful body in the Solar system

So what are we saying? "MOVE YOUR HIPS". Many motions, attacks, defenses and postures as previously said are taken from the nature world and/or based on our natural surroundings. Animals, bodies of water, mountains and landmasses, mythical creatures even the Constellations have played an inventive part in Martial Arts.

Another signature motion of Goju Ryu is the fluidity of the hands. To make the hands appear as they are flowing like water is to make the proper technique. When we block we do not block with the fingertips however the fingertips should be as far away from the block as possible. Your fingers should always flow behind as practiced extensively in Tensho. Goju Ryu is a graceful art.

1. Always turn on the ball of your feet and keep your knees bent (with the exception of Zenkutsu Dachi). Turning on the heel of your foot is an easy imbalance as well as straightening you legs completely removes the opportunity to lower your center of gravity as well as limits your immediate first motions (whatever that or they might be). This limited motion is because the knee must first bend before momentum can be delivered into any direction unless falling from gravity. Straightening the knees and turning on the heels is equivalent to standing a pencil on its sharp end and expecting it to stay erect! It’s just not going to happen. Also remember that when one leg leaves the ground the other must bend. This also applies to Sagi Ashi Dachi.

2. Look before or maintain visual contact with oncoming opponents.

3. Maintain your head level.

4. Remember for every ‘GO’ movement there is a ‘JU’ movement. As well as for every attack there is a counter. And again for every counter another counter and so on (Sabaki)

5. For every pull there is a push - for every push there is a pull.

6. Tenshin and Sabaki

7. Character in Kumite

8. The shoulders must stay down and are always relaxed

9. The hips must turn and rotate

10. The wrist (hand) must turn at the proper point of execution.

11. From birth humans know how to strike and kick however blocking must be learned.

The tensing that is carried out during the breathing exercises is similar to that carried on in dynamic tension and isometric exercises. Tensing is believed to build up physical strength. And that goes internally, too, where the breathing is said to strengthen the heart and other vital organs. Generally whenever you are pulling your hand to chamber or blocking you are inhaling and when you are extending a part of the body, hitting the floor, or striking you will exhale. There is another side to the breathing exercises, the side concerned with the mental and spiritual aspects of Karate. By its very nature, this is the side most difficult to grasp for many persons. The most advanced type of breathing exercise is that in which all of one's strength is concentrated on a specific feeling or thought. It is through concentration and meditation that man learns to improve himself. The student is taught never to exhale all his breath at once but to ration it out in short breathes. One reason is to always save a little breath so that an opponent cannot strike when one is out of breath and at one's weakest just before inhaling. The idea is always to save a little breath to counter.

Striking & Targets


The body is almost unlimited to the possible combination of ways to strike what to strike with and where to strike. What is limited however is what strike is effective when used in certain ways or to attack certain points. Specific striking used in a non-specific manner is a waste of time, energy and efficiency.

The absolute of all basic striking is Seiken Tsuki or front fist strike. Most other strikes covered and performed can be accomplished beginning with Seiken Tsuki. To make a proper Seiken Tsuki, place the hand out in front of you, roll the fingertips (not including the thumb yet) to a point as close to the bottom of the fingers as possible. Next roll the knuckles down so all the fingers collapse into the palm making the ring finger and the pinky especially tight[2]. Then fold the thumb over the second digit of the fingers.

There is a great deal of moving in and out quickly and weaving from side to side, in contrast to the hard schools which concentrate more on straightforward and linear movements. Naturally, all this fast motion lends itself to graceful and artistic techniques. A basic stance, called the cat stance, is a very soft one with one forward foot poised heel high, ready to move quickly in any direction.

[1] See also appendix on WKF, WUKO, USANKF.

[2]Some reference for this section came from ‘KICK’ illustrated, September 1983, ‘Basics of Basics’. new_page_1.htm

Helper Kicking Exercises for Mawashi Geri


First of all the round kick that is chambered to the front is what used to be called in the old school Yoko Geri (that is if you bring your knee up in front of you then pivot and turn with the kick when executed). Mawashi Geri is chambered to the side and then executed with a pivot. Try this series of techniques to improve the very hard to master Mawashi Geri:

1. Stand in Heiko Dachi, Kumite Kamae (parallel stance, hands up fighting posture. Step Migi, HanZenkutsu Dachi (right foot move forward half front stance) being careful to keep you hands in fighting position instead of letting them fly around. Bring you left knee up to execute Mawashi Geri, pause, Execute & pull back to Hiki Geri immediately (chamber Mawashi Geri) then bring back to original position, then back to Heiko Dachi. Repeat to other side. This will develop proper form (especially for those with abnormally bad form or limited stretching ability). You may execute this drill quickly after a very clean performance has been acquired however, be careful only to do it quickly after you have discovered the MAJOR hip rotation and proper pivot location in the kick

2. Try the same exercise using the back of a wood chair or any fixed back chair as a minimal height target, this forces you to bring you kick in a circular motion as not to hit the chair (correct Mawashi Geri).

3. Lay down on the ground, on your left side, with you left elbow and forearm on the ground and your left knee bent (also on the ground). Elevate your right knee to 45 Degrees (at all angles). Keep your right arm in Kamae position. Have a partner hold a target (Makiwara is used in our Dojo but kick pad or target is OK) focus on:

A. Driving through target

B. Pulling back leg

C. Speed of kick

This is a 40 to 50-count exercise per side before switching; the person counting for you should be a very experienced chanter (teacher).


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Szacuny 2 Napisanych postów 931 Na forum 17 lat Przeczytanych tematów 21743
Heh niezle. A tak w skrócie i po polskiemu ;) :

Twórcą stylu Goju Ryu był niejaki Chojun Miyagi pochodzący z Okinawy. Miyagi w młodosci uczyl sie podstaw sztuk walki u mistrza Chinskiego Boksu oraz styli karate pochodzacych z Okinawy, Kanryo Higaonna.Po smierci swojego mistrza sam Miyagi udał sie do Chin gdzie kontynuował naukę różnych styli Kung-fu. W 1928 roku Miyagi wyjechal do Japonii gdzie poszukiwano nauczycieli z Okinawy (to był okres działalnosci Funakoshiego).
W Japonii jednym z niewielu jego uczniów został Gogen Yamaguchi, który również pózniej stworzyl styl Gojukai. Ponieważ Miyagi tesknil za domem oraz Japonczycy rzadko prosili go o nauke, wrócił na Okinawe gdzie zmarl 8 wrzesnia 1953 roku. Goju-ryu oznacza "Styl miękko-twardy" ponieważ Miyagi całe życie pracował nad stylem ktory mial sie opierac na przeciwienstwach (wiecie jin i jang) oraz nad tym aby jego styl był "czysto Japoński".

No to by bylo na tyle. Moze ktos cos bedzie mial do dodania (lub poprawy- Boruta hehe ;) ).
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Szacuny 19 Napisanych postów 4247 Na forum 17 lat Przeczytanych tematów 28873
Hmmmm,a moze ktos to cwiczy?
Z gazetet wiem ze jest pare sekcji tego w Polsce.

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Szacuny 2 Napisanych postów 931 Na forum 17 lat Przeczytanych tematów 21743
Nie wiem ja jeszcze o sekcji nie slyszalem ale napewno jakies sa.
A co myslisz Ronowicz o ****o- Ryu?? Ten styl jest oparty z tego co wiem głównie na szybkosci. Dlatego jest popularny na zawodach (a w kazdym razie byl kilkanascie lat temu, teraz jest juz wiele nowych styli ktore wypieraja stare). Słyszeliście tez moze o karatece Nanbu??
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Erm?? czemu tam sa gwazdki?? :) Mialo byc oczywiscie S.h.i.t.o-ryu ;)
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Szacuny 19 Napisanych postów 4247 Na forum 17 lat Przeczytanych tematów 28873
****o ryu mi sie podoba ze wzgledu na mnogosc technik.
Hmmm...poszukam.

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Szacuny 1 Napisanych postów 300 Na forum 17 lat Przeczytanych tematów 12009
Jezeli chodzi o Goju Ryu to... ja cwicze :)
W Szczecinie (gdzie trenuje) znajduje sie Honbu dojo Gojukai Polska. Oprocz tego jest kilka klubow na dolnym slasku (Wroclaw, Scinawa, Legnica...)
Sa jeszcze szkoly: okinawa goju ryu i jundokan (troche slabo dzialajace)
Co do stylu to trenuje goju od roku- wczesniej shotokan (5 lat)- i moge powiedziec, ze dopiero tu zaczynam uczyc sie walczyc. Przede wszystkim duzo kontaktowych sparingow i wieksza realnosc w porownaniu z shotokanem. Walka raczej w pol dystansie, kolana, rzuty (karateckie , lapanie przeciwnika. (Nie)stety jest to jednak styl "tradycyjny" co narzuca pewna forme treningu... mi jednak to lezy, sparuje z jednym bjj'owcem pochodze troche na boks i bedzie gucio ;)

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Szacuny 2 Napisanych postów 931 Na forum 17 lat Przeczytanych tematów 21743
Ale to jest Goju-ryu czy Gojukai?? Bo napisales ze cwiczysz Goju ryu w Honbu Dojo GOJUKAI Polska a to dwa rozne style (notabene podobne).
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Szacuny 1 Napisanych postów 300 Na forum 17 lat Przeczytanych tematów 12009
Styl jest jeden: Goju Ryu
Podzielone jest jakby na dwa odlamy: Okinawa Goju Ryu i Goju kai(Japonia JKF). Ponadto pod Goju kai sa wyodrebnione jeszcze poszczegolne szkoly: seiwa kai, jundokan, i nie pamietam :)
Generalnie to wszystko nie rozni sie wiele od siebie. Okinawa stawia bardziej na metody treningu tradycyjne, wiecej kata, kihon kumite cwiczenia na przyzadach. Goju kai postawilo wiecej na kumite (Gohen Yamaguci) i ruchliwosc.
Jak jeszcze jakies pytania to wal smialo.

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Przepraszam, czy tu biją?? ;)

A tak serio to nie mam pytań, pozatym ze Miyagi byl mistrzem Gogena Yamaguchi ktory potem zalozyl Gojukai, ale wlasciwie to bez wiekszej roznicy.
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